3 Simple Things That Could Make or Break Your Development Team


03/25/2019

development team
It doesn't matter if you are a small startup or an enterprise giant, or if you have in-house development teams or contractors. The effectiveness of your tech teams is an integral part of your business success and strategic growth.

We live in a world driven by technology, and technology is changing fast. Companies can't escape this reality. It's either evolve with technology or become extinct. Don't take my word for it. Think about the evolution of technology in industries like transportation (Uber), retail (Amazon), and video (Netflix). You can try to escape reality, but you will probably fail.

One of the first things that comes to mind when talking about software development teams is to ask if teams are absolutely necessary. Can't we rely on individual tech professionals instead of teams working for our companies? Maybe the whole is not more than the sum of its parts?

The fact is that, in general, teams outperform individuals. When people work in a team toward a common goal, they combine their skills. In a team, individual performance increases, and people are able to solve more complex problems, efficiently and effectively.

My name is Joshua Candamo. I'm a technology leader with a PhD in computer science. My background is pretty diverse, and includes considerable experience programming as well as over 14 years of technology leadership.

I am currently a Director of Development for Accusoft, a software development company specializing in content processing, conversion, and automation solutions. My engineering group collaborates with about 40 people including in-house software developers, offshore contractors, technical writers, product management, quality, marketing, and sales professionals.

I want to share what I've learned from my personal experience of building development teams over the last 14 years, and a few useful tips to doing so successfully.

Without further ado, let's talk about the three simple things that I found can make or break development teams.

To get started, let's point out the obvious. Don't fight nature; embrace it.

If you try to plant a rose in the middle of the desert, it will most certainly die.

You can't fight nature. However, if you understand nature, you can embrace it and make decisions that align with it.

You can simply build a greenhouse in a harsh environment and succeed at growing a rose pretty much anywhere. Using the same logic, there are some foundational pieces that you have to anticipate in order to build a successful team. Avoiding basic considerations of team building will likely make your development team fail or underperform.

Team building is a broad and complex topic. And, it's also a topic that I'm passionate about. Not everything around team building is complicated. However, most initiatives require a methodical approach to correctly execute them.

I'll go over three ideas that are straightforward to implement, and don't require major capital investment. Learn more in the rest of my article here.

 


 

Josh Candamo, Director of SDKs

Josh Candamo, Director of SDKs

Joshua Candamo, PhD, Development Director for the SDK product group, oversees the development and maintenance of 22 of Accusoft SDK imaging products. He believes that your most valuable intellectual property has nothing to do with patents or technology, but everything to do with your people. He is passionate about team building and creating the right corporate culture to develop amazing software products. Josh joined Accusoft in 2015 after a career in software development that included technology leadership, entrepreneurship, consulting, and both back-end and front-end development. He holds a PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of South Florida, specializing in pattern recognition and image processing.

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